Free Cloud Report

  

Free Report Download: If You Are Considering Cloud Computing For Your Company – Don’t, Until You Read This …

 

If you are considering cloud computing or Office 365 to save money and simplify IT, it is extremely important that you get and read this special report, “5 Critical Facts Every Business Owner Must Know Before Moving Their Network To The Cloud.”

 

This report will discuss in simple, non-technical terms the pros and cons of cloud computing, data security, how to choose a cloud provider, as well as 3 little-known facts that most IT consultants don’t know or won’t tell you about cloud computing that could end up causing you MORE problems and costing you more money than you anticipated.

Even if you aren’t ready to move to the cloud yet, this report will give you the right information and questions to ask when the time comes.

 

Get Your Free Copy Today: http://achillcomputerservices.com/cloud-report.html

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OpenStack Cloud Platform

Dell, Red Hat team to sell OpenStack cloud platform

Dell building high-end system to run Red Hat’s OpenStack implemention

By Joab Jackson

December 12, 2013 03:24 PM ET

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IDG News Service – Dell will start selling systems early next year that run Red Hat’s version of the OpenStack open-source cloud platform.

The offering will be tailored for large enterprises that wish to set up private clouds, said Radhesh Balakrishnan, Red Hat general manager for virtualization and OpenStack.

Dell announced the partnership Thursday at the company’s Dell World enterprise users conference in Austin, Texas.

Dell is the second major enterprise systems company to use OpenStack as the basis for a line of enterprise private cloud products. Earlier this week, Hewlett-Packard also announced that the newest version of its own CloudSystem private cloud systems run the company’s HP Cloud OS, which is based on OpenStack.

Both announcements suggest that OpenStack may be ready for enterprise use, or at least coming close to enterprise readiness.

In a recently posted commentary, Gartner research director Alessandro Perilli said that the OpenStack project lacks clarity about its goals, and OpenStack vendors lack transparency around their business models. As a result, enterprises should still be wary of OpenStack, Perilli argued.

“There are definitely parts of OpenStack platform that are still have a ways to go in terms of maturing,” Balakrishnan said at DellWorld, pointing by way of an example to its still nascent technologies for offering networking as a service. The core parts of the software, however, are operationally solid and Red Hat has worked to bring these components to the level of an “enterprise grade implementation,” he said.

“We fundamentally believe that OpenStack will be the new data-center fabric of the future,” Balakrishnan said.

Dell and Red Hat will work together to engineer the system, which will be built using Dell hardware and the next version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform. Dell did not delve into details about the possible hardware configurations, though the package will use Red Hat’s Linux OpenStack Platform 4, which is currently in beta.

This Red Hat software package includes the latest version of OpenStack, named Havana, as well as Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5.

Dell’s Cloud Services will sell the system, which will be implemented by the unit’s Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform practice.

The offering will be among the first products of a newly expanded partnership between Dell and Red Hat. Dell and Red Hat have been long-time partners. Dell has been using Red Hat software in its own packaged systems for 14 years.

Dell and Red Hat will also work together on a number of projects to further improve OpenStack. They will work on OpenStack Neutron, a project to bring Software-Defined Networking capabilities to OpenStack, allowing the platform to offer networking as a service. They will also collaborate on Ceilometer, a project to improve OpenStack instrumentation for monitoring and billing purposes.

In related private cloud news, Dell also announced Thursday that it would include the open-source Eucalyptus cloud software on its packages of server, storage, and networking equipment.

Eucalyptus replicates the APIs (application programming interfaces) of the Amazon Web Services’ Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2), allowing organizations to replicate the AWS service on their own networks.

REBLOG FROM:  Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab’s e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

Dell, Red Hat team to sell OpenStack cloud platform

Dell building high-end system to run Red Hat’s OpenStack implemention

By Joab Jackson
December 12, 2013 03:24 PM ET

IDG News Service – Dell will start selling systems early next year that run Red Hat’s version of the OpenStack open-source cloud platform.

The offering will be tailored for large enterprises that wish to set up private clouds, said Radhesh Balakrishnan, Red Hat general manager for virtualization and OpenStack.

Dell announced the partnership Thursday at the company’s Dell World enterprise users conference in Austin, Texas.

Dell is the second major enterprise systems company to use OpenStack as the basis for a line of enterprise private cloud products. Earlier this week, Hewlett-Packard also announced that the newest version of its own CloudSystem private cloud systems run the company’s HP Cloud OS, which is based on OpenStack.

Both announcements suggest that OpenStack may be ready for enterprise use, or at least coming close to enterprise readiness.

In a recently posted commentary, Gartner research director Alessandro Perilli said that the OpenStack project lacks clarity about its goals, and OpenStack vendors lack transparency around their business models. As a result, enterprises should still be wary of OpenStack, Perilli argued.

“There are definitely parts of OpenStack platform that are still have a ways to go in terms of maturing,” Balakrishnan said at DellWorld, pointing by way of an example to its still nascent technologies for offering networking as a service. The core parts of the software, however, are operationally solid and Red Hat has worked to bring these components to the level of an “enterprise grade implementation,” he said.

“We fundamentally believe that OpenStack will be the new data-center fabric of the future,” Balakrishnan said.

Dell and Red Hat will work together to engineer the system, which will be built using Dell hardware and the next version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform. Dell did not delve into details about the possible hardware configurations, though the package will use Red Hat’s Linux OpenStack Platform 4, which is currently in beta.

This Red Hat software package includes the latest version of OpenStack, named Havana, as well as Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Hypervisor and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5.

Dell’s Cloud Services will sell the system, which will be implemented by the unit’s Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform practice.

The offering will be among the first products of a newly expanded partnership between Dell and Red Hat. Dell and Red Hat have been long-time partners. Dell has been using Red Hat software in its own packaged systems for 14 years.

Dell and Red Hat will also work together on a number of projects to further improve OpenStack. They will work on OpenStack Neutron, a project to bring Software-Defined Networking capabilities to OpenStack, allowing the platform to offer networking as a service. They will also collaborate on Ceilometer, a project to improve OpenStack instrumentation for monitoring and billing purposes.

– See more at: http://feeds.computerworld.com/s/article/9244756/Dell_Red_Hat_team_to_sell_OpenStack_cloud_platform?taxonomyId=158#sthash.U0frauxZ.dpuf

Choosing the Correct Cloud Provider

Every Memphis business should pick the right Cloud

The cloud is marvelous invention that can help any company become more productive. However, this piece of technology isn’t without a few dangers. When every Memphis area business is deciding on which cloud-based company to work with, the business should proceed with caution. The cloud is wonderful but collaborating partnering with the wrong company can lead to a path full of disaster. Always make sure to thoroughly research the cloud-based company before you commit to a contract.

Don’t let any salesperson talk you in to signing a contract before you do your research. A few questions should be asked about any company working with cloud-based computing.

1. Do you know what hardware and software this company uses? You may not understand all the technical details that the salesperson tells you, but there is probably an employee in your company that does. Get this information to that person and find out exactly what it means. The more you know the better off you’ll be in the end.

2. Do you know any other businesses that have used the cloud-based company before? Finding out the opinions of your peers is a great way to see if the cloud-based company stands by its word. You have to be able to trust the company that will be handling all your computer related business. Past performance is usually an indicator of future success.

3. Does the company have a history of down time? Many companies that do business in the cloud will have significant down time. This means that you will not have access to your software and projects while the cloud is offline. If the company has a history of extended times where the services are unreachable, do not commit to this company.  What is there strategy for addressing this if it does occur?

4. Can the cloud-based company explain to you what their services are in layman’s language? This will help prove that the company has a grasp of their own products and services. You speak English, so should your Cloud partner.

Do you have any questions about cloud computing and cloud-based companies? Give Achill Computer Services a call for more information. We would love to talk to you and answer any questions that you or your colleagues might have.